Tag Archives: Meryl Davis and Charlie White

SKATING magazine – April Cover

7 Apr

Every month we will unveil the new cover for the upcoming issue of SKATING magazine. Here is the cover for the April issue featuring Olympic champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White.

DWCover

2013 Grand Prix Final, Junior Grand Prix Final – Day 4 Recap

7 Dec

Useful Links

Twitter  #GPF13  |  Competition Notes (PDF)

Live Results/Starting Orders  |  icenetwork Event Page

Team USA closed a strong week at the Grand Prix Final and Junior Grand Prix Final by adding a pair of medals Sunday in the junior dance event. Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker earned silver as their training mate Kaitlyn Weaver cheered them from the stands. Lorraine McNamara and Quinn Carpenter took home the bronze.

Hawayek and Baker’s goal was to skate with as much heart and soul as possible, and that accomplishment was reflected Sunday in their PCS mark. The “second mark” totaled 44.86 of their 81.37 points. Their total score was 139.42.

Said Baker, “We try to put as much heart and soul into the programs as we can. It’s thrilling to know the hard work pays off and we are really happy to put out performances we are proud of.”

The couple acknowledged their levels were lower than they want them to be so that will be a point of emphasis going into their next events.

“We are happy with the scores for the levels we got this week,” Hawayek explained. “Levels are something we’re going to be pushing toward for our next competitions, nationals and hopefully junior worlds. We’re not going to give up the fight. We are going to really work on drilling those levels.”

McNamara and Carpenter delivered an intense and powerful program to the music of Sherlock Holmes and earned 80.75 points.

“I think we did a clean skate today,” Carpenter said. “Of course there are always little things. By the end we’re worn down a little. It’s a very intense program and sometimes it takes a minute to come out of character and back to ourselves.”

Their total score was 135.89 points. Rachel Parsons and Michael Parsons finished sixth, while the gold medal went to Russia’s Anna Yanovskaya and Sergey Mozgov with 152.48 points.

In all, the Americans captured five medals including ice dance gold and ladies bronze. Meryl Davis and Charlie White extended their historical streak to five consecutive Grand Prix Final titles and they did so in world record fashion, setting world marks in short dance, free dance and overall. Capturing bronze, Ashley Wagner became the first U.S. lady to win medals at back-to-back Grand Prix Finals since Sasha Cohen did so in 2002 and ’03.

Nathan Chen won bronze in the junior men’s event, while Polina Edmunds and Angela Wang finished fourth and sixth, respectively, in the junior ladies event.

We now look forward to the 2014 Prudential U.S. Figure Skating Championships, at the conclusion of which we will nominate the 2014 U.S. Olympic Figure Skating Team. The U.S. Championships are set for Jan. 5-12, in Boston, with the big announcement to be made Jan. 12. For more information, please visit www.boston2014.com.

2013 Grand Prix Final, Junior Grand Prix Final – Day 2 Recap

6 Dec

Useful Links

Twitter  #GPF13  |  Competition Notes (PDF)

Live Results/Starting Orders  |  icenetwork Event Page

Before Meryl Davis and Charlie White won the short dance by the narrowest of margins, Nathan Chen hauled in the junior men’s bronze medal and the junior ladies event concluded as the Grand Prix Final and Junior Grand Prix Final continued Friday from Marina Messe Arena in Fukuoka, Japan.

Davis and White set a world record short dance score of 77.66 and take a 0.07 point lead over Canadian rivals Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir into Saturday’s free dance. Davis and White, performing to My Fair Lady, achieved Level 4s on all five of their elements.

“It definitely felt like a season’s best in terms of performance and technically,” Davis said. “There’s a lot of room for growth in this program still which we are really excited about. It definitely feels like the best we have put out this season and it’s nice to see that on the scoreboard as well.”

The PCS mark proved to be the difference between first and second. Virtue and Moir held a 0.15 edge in the technical mark, but Davis and White’s second mark of 38.73 bested that of the Canadians by 0.22.

Following the performance, White acknowledged their competitors’ high score.

“There were a little bit of extra nerves on the bigger stage against the good ole Canadian rivals over here who we knew would put down a good score,” White explained. “It’s hard to block out a score like that before you skate. But we settled in quickly. Technically all level fours, we are really happy with that. It’s just a lot of hard work. We feel like there is room to grow still so that’s exciting. Overall, we are pleased with our performance.”

Tomorrow’s action will feature both the free dance and ladies free skate with Team USA is poised to medal in both events. First, we will watch as Davis and White skate to extend their historical Grand Prix Final win streak to five. Meanwhile, with a medal here, Wagner would be the first American woman to win medals at back-to-back finals since Sasha Cohen (gold 2002, silver 2003). She is in third place. The junior ice dancers will finally begin competition tomorrow. Team USA makes up half of the field in dance.

In the junior men’s competition, Chen maintained his third-place standing after performing a clean free skate, triple Axel and all.

“There is room for improvement always but overall I think I did very well. I got my triple Axel which is a big bonus for me.”

Chen earned 214.61 points overall and just four points separated the Southern California-based skater from the gold medalist Boyang Jin of China. Jin, in his second JGP Final, pulled off the upset moving up from fifth after the short program to take the title. Russia’s Adian Pitkeev  won silver.

Polina Edmunds skated her best free skate of the season, earning 113.51 points, a score that was second-highest among the ladies. She finished fourth overall with 161.71 points and was just two points out of medal contention. Her program, skated to music from Peer Gynt, featured a triple Lutz-triple toe combination and an additional triple flip-loop-triple Salchow sequence. All three spins were Level 4.

“I was happy that I fought through it,” Edmunds said of her free skate. “It was a good program and I’m glad I did it well. Today I really fought for anything and I didn’t want to let anything go after yesterday when I let a few moments slip. I’m happy I did that.”

The gold medal belonged to Maria Sotskova, who shared the podium with two teammates from Russia. Sotskova earned a total score of 176.75.

Angela Wang, competing in her second straight Junior Grand Prix Final, endured a few hiccups this week and finished sixth. Both American ladies will now train their senior programs in preparation for the 2014 Prudential U.S. Figure Skating Championships next month.

The leaders/winners are as follows in the events where Team USA is not represented:
Junior pairs (final): Xiaoyu Yu and Yang Jing (China) 163.52 points
Senior men (final): Yuzuru Hanyu (Japan) 293.25 points
Senior pairs:  Tatiana Volosozhar and Maxim Trankov (Russia) 82.65

Saturday, Dec. 7
1 a.m. – Junior short dance (LIVE)
Parsons and Parsons – 1:06 a.m.
McNarara and Carpenter – 5:33 a.m.
Hawayek and Baker – 5:39 a.m.
2:15 a.m. – Senior pairs free (LIVE)
3:50 a.m. – Senior free dance (LIVE)
Davis and White – 4:42 a.m.
5:20 a.m. – Senior ladies free (LIVE)
Wagner – 5:51 a.m.
10:15 p.m. – Junior free dance (LIVE)

UNIVERSAL SPORTS NETWORK 2013 GRAND PRIX FINAL BROADCAST SCHEDULE
(All times Eastern; subject to change)

Friday, Dec. 6
11 a.m. – Pairs short
6 p.m. – Short dance

Saturday, Dec. 7
11 a.m. – Pairs free
Noon – Free dance

2013 Grand Prix Final, Junior Grand Prix Final – Day 1 Recap

5 Dec

Useful Links

Twitter  #GPF13  |  Competition Notes (PDF)

Live Results/Starting Orders  |  icenetwork Event Page

The “Final” ISU event prior to the 2014 Olympic Winter Games got under way Thursday from Marina Messe Arena in Fukuoka, Japan. Team USA is represented in five events over the junior and senior ranks at the 2013 Grand Prix and Junior Grand finals.

Ashley Wagner is in position to win her second straight Grand Prix Final medal as she sits in a close third place after the short program. Wagner’s clean “Shine on You Crazy Diamond” performance featured her best triple flip-triple toe combination of the season – an element which accounted for 10.20 of her 68.14 points.

“It was awesome,” she said simply after the program. “I am so happy with the performance. The flip-toe felt great, the spins felt really great. I feel really good. I wish the score had been higher, we’ll see what happens in the protocol. But so far so good.”

Japan’s Mao Asada leads with 72.36 points. Wagner very narrowly trails Russia’s Adelina Sotnikova, who totaled 68.38 points.

Nathan Chen, who came into the event as the No. 1 seeded skater, sits in a close third place after the short program. Despite falling on the second half of his triple Lutz-triple toe combo, Chen is just two points behind the leader Keiji Tanaka from Japan. The aforementioned element still received 9.11 points and the program’s remaining six elements all received positive GOEs. Chen’s total score was 71.52 points. Tanaka earned a season-high of 73.63 points in front of the home crowd. Russia’s Adian Pitkeev is in second.

Thursday’s action began with the junior ladies short program, in which Team USA has a pair of entries. Polina Edmunds and Angela Wang, who is competing in here second JGP Final, are in fifth and sixth places, respectively. Both ladies struggled with their jumps and shared the sentiment of hoping for a stronger showing in Friday’s free skate.

Wang said simply, “I want to skate better and show what I have been doing in training.”

A quartet of Russian ladies make up the top four and is led by Maria Sotskova with 61.29 points.

The leaders are as follows in the events where Team USA is not represented:
Junior pairs: Xiaoyu Yu and Yang Jing (China) 61.10 points
Senior men: Yuzuru Hanyu (Japan) 99.84 points

Friday will be another busy day for the Americans with the conclusion of the junior ladies and men’s events and the senior short dance featuring four time reigning Grand Prix Final champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White. Davis and White are undefeated dating back to 2012 Skate America and have won three gold medals this season.

The junior ice dancers still have a day to wait. Their events are set for Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, Dec. 6
12:30 a.m. – Junior ladies free (LIVE)
Wang – 12:37 a.m.
Edmunds – 12:44 a.m.
1:40 a.m. – Junior men’s free (LIVE)
Chen – 2:11 a.m.
3 a.m. – Senior pairs short (LIVE)
4:15 a.m. – Senior short dance (LIVE)
Davis and White – 5:01 a.m.
5:30 a.m. – Senior men’s free (LIVE)
6:50 a.m. – Junior pairs short (LIVE)

Saturday, Dec. 7
1 a.m. – Junior short dance (LIVE)
Parsons and Parsons – 1:06 a.m.
McNarara and Carpenter – 5:33 a.m.
Hawayek and Baker – 5:39 a.m.
2:15 a.m. – Senior pairs free (LIVE)
3:50 a.m. – Senior free dance (LIVE)
5:20 a.m. – Senior ladies free (LIVE)
Wagner – 5:51 a.m.
10:15 p.m. – Junior free dance (LIVE)

UNIVERSAL SPORTS NETWORK 2013 GRAND PRIX FINAL BROADCAST SCHEDULE
(All times Eastern; subject to change)

Thursday, Dec. 5
6 p.m. – Men’s short
8 p.m. – Ladies short

Friday, Dec. 6
11 a.m. – Pairs short
6 p.m. – Short dance

Saturday, Dec. 7
11 a.m. – Pairs free
Noon – Free dance

SKATING magazine – May Issue

3 Jun

Click on the cover to view the entire digital version of the May SKATING magazine.

2013 may cover 4

SKATING magazine – May Cover

2 May

Every month we will unveil the new cover for the upcoming issue of SKATING magazine. Here is the cover for the May issue featuring World champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White.

2013 may cover 4

Our Time in London

11 Apr

Editor’s Note: For the last 16 years, Cheryl Davis and Jacqui White have traveled the world together, supporting their children from their first steps as a team to becoming the faces of American ice dancing. In March, Meryl Davis and Charlie White claimed their second World Championships gold medal, making them not only the first U.S. ice dancing team to win one title, but two. Here, Jacqui shares their experiences at the event.

 

By Jacqui White

There are moments that are beyond words. Moments that can only be understood on an emotional level. I have to admit, I had a very hard time writing this blog about my experience at the World Championships in London, Ontario.. I just couldn’t put into words the emotional roller coaster that I experienced at this event. It took me a while to sort it out before I could put fingers to keyboard.

Right off the bat, we started on a different path by driving instead of flying the 139 miles to London in three different cars: Cheryl with Meryl, Charlie alone in his car and me with the Finnish team.

We dropped the skaters off at the Hilton Doubletree, where Cheryl and I picked up our bus passes before heading over to check out our hotel, which was about 10 minutes away. We weren’t sure what to expect when we came around the winding road and long drive to the Windermere Manor, but Cheryl and I share a love of old, quaint places with character, and that’s exactly what our hotel was. It was perfect.

In a separate wing of the building was a cafe that had a sun room with a lovely tree-filled view and a cozy indoor area with a fireplace. Of course, the food was terrific and, as we discovered all over London, the people couldn’t do enough to please us.

Cheryl had visited family in London many times, so she acted as my tour guide when we drove the route to our kids’ hotel twice a day. I would describe it as “Old London” meets the down-home charm of Mayberry, USA, with lots of mom and pop shops and restaurants.

We traveled on the bus with the skaters to the practice sessions and things couldn’t have gone better. Meryl and Charlie skated their programs beautifully and so did all of the other dance teams (at least in my humble opinion). We tried our best to enjoy this moment before the competition started.

On the day of the short dance, Cheryl and I rode the bus to the arena. Meryl’s dad, Paul, was to meet us there.

Cheryl and I were nervous wrecks. We gave our kids good luck hugs and headed inside to watch. The Budweiser Garden was packed and the crowd was warmed up by the time we took our seats. We sat with the family, which is rare. Everyone that has been to competitions with Cheryl and me knows that you can’t speak to us. It’s a rule; we cannot abide anyone interrupting our focus on the skating, except each other. We whisper back and forth throughout the event. I call out the scores while Cheryl jots them down on a scrap of whatever she has on hand. This is mainly to have something to do to help handle our nerves.

It’s funny how 15 years of competition hasn’t helped us. We’re even more nervous now than when they started competing. Fortunately, our families are very kind and understanding of our nervous quirks.

The crowd was warm and cheered for all the skaters as they went through their short dances and cheered wildly when the fifth warm-up group came onto the ice. This group included both Canadian teams and Meryl and Charlie.

Cheryl and I glanced at each other; Meryl and Charlie were skating first in their group. My heart was in my throat and Cheryl was nervously tapping her foot. The Giselle music began and we held our breath. Time stood still while I watched my son skate across the ice with his delicate partner, lifting her and spinning her around effortlessly and beautifully to the music. Then they stood in the center of the ice for the cheering crowd. They knew and we knew they had skated well, the way they had trained, and it showed on their smiling faces. Cheryl and I jumped up and hugged each other with relief and tears.

Meryl and Charlie won the first round, the short dance, but we knew it was far from over so we rejoiced like there was no tomorrow.

Friday night, Paul, Cheryl and I had dinner with our friend and seamstress, LuAnne, and her sister, Bonnie, at our cafe. We ate, drank and laughed for hours until everyone else was gone. The cafe staff was great and encouraged us to stay as long as we wanted. We stayed very late because we knew the next day we faced the free dance.

Saturday, reinforcements arrived in the form of my husband, Charlie. He brought our daughters, their husbands and our grandkids Avery and Vince (big fans of Meryl and Charlie). I welcomed the extra support and voices for cheering.

Paul and Charlie rode the bus with us and the skaters to the arena, but my nerves were not feeling better. They went to sit with the family and some loyal friends.

Cheryl and I took our seats; we were on our own. Our hearts rode on the edges of their blades. We felt every edge and glide in our souls. We, “the moms,” have been on this ride with them from the start. We know what this meant to them. At that moment, it meant the world.

With the first strains of music, the arena was quiet. Cheryl and I were hanging on by a thread as our kids skated through their free dance with speed and passion. We had faith in them even though we couldn’t breathe. They finished their program exhausted and exhilarated to a standing crowd and skated to their coach, Marina. They awaited their scores with that face of innocent anticipation.

There. They had done it. They won the World Championships. Cheryl and I danced and cried in each other’s arms awhile before we turned to our phones to call the dads.

It’s an emotional roller coaster. One we wouldn’t trade for the world.

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